The Writer’s Life with Author Michael Ditchfield

michael_106 (2)Michael Ditchfield continues to live and work in the United States after moving here from England. He finds time between his successful restaurants to engage in humanitarian causes in Africa. He is especially focused on Ethiopia, after many years in Rwanda and Sudan. Michael spends the rest of his time speaking about the plight of the people in these countries, with an emphasis on bettering our lives from understanding theirs. He is currently working on his next book.

What’s inside the mind of a non-fiction author?

The willingness to serve others through the written word.  I’ve has been involved  in saving lives in Africa and now wanted the means to keep these acts moving forward in print so the world can contemplate the process.

What is so great about being an author?

To be a true and passionate messenger of what the written word portrays. I believe through print that results are attainable to better this world and bring thought -provoking discussion to light on the subject matter.

When do you hate it?

When I am not writing.

What is a regular writing day like for you? Be honest!

I wake up around 4am and after coffee begins the thought process of what I’m trying to achieve that day. When the thoughts are lifeless I walk the park or go to the gym, returning to write again. The evening holds little for the process as the downtime is needed to re-charge the batteries.

Do you think authors have big egos? Do you? How do you know?

Some do, but that is their make-up. I relish my accomplishments in an appreciative manner. Talent is God-given. Conceit is self- given.

How do you handle negative reviews?

There is always a committee of “they.” He rolls with the punches. Good reviews are not always that good and bad reviews are not always that bad.

LTS-front (2)What is the usual response when you tell a new acquaintance that you’re an author?

They are impressed as they usually realize the sacrifice and passion needed. They always wanted to write something themselves but just never got started.

What do you do on those days you don’t feel like writing? Do you force it or take a break?

Takes a break unless procrastination has brought a deadline closer to reality.

Any writing quirks?

Napkins to paper to lap top.

Have you worked on your novel intoxicated? What was the result?

Some of the greatest parts of the book came after a glass or two of Pappy Van Winkles. I wouldn’t call it intoxicated merely “merry.”

What would you do if people around you didn’t take your writing seriously or see it as a hobby?

Congratulate them for making me feel more special and accomplished.

Some authors seem to have a love-hate relationship to writing. Can you relate? 

Romeo and Juliet never had it so good.

Do you think success as an author must be linked to money?

In my case with the latest book, yes, as more lives in Africa can be saved. A portion of the book sales go towards my African passion at Project Mercy.

Leave us with some words of wisdom.

Don’t prove others wrong, instead prove yourself right!

////////////////////////////////////

Title: Life’s Too Short for Leftovers – 9 Lessons from a Third World Kitchen

Genre: Memoir

Author: Michael Ditchfield

Website: http://MichaelDitchfield.com

Publisher: Black Crown

Purchase link: http://amzn.com/099625370X

Ditchfield takes the reader on his personal journey with his mentor to Africa. Here he enlightens us on what we can learn from people going through extreme hardship, and how we can benefit from such revelation. He spends time applying this knowledge in a way that allows us to reflect and act with our own personal growth.

Leave a comment

Filed under Author Interviews

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s